Episode 14

How Can I Give Effective Feedback on a Presentation?

In this week's episode of Ongoing Mastery: Presenting & Speaking, Kirsten and Kellie pick up on a thread from last week’s episode about the importance of having speaker friends. Often only other speakers give feedback on your performance that is specific, practical, and honest. Kirsten and Kellie discuss ways to give feedback and the mindset necessary for receiving it. They also compare their favorite walk-out music to get pumped up for a presentation.

Key take-aways:

  • Speakers give the best feedback to other speakers because they know the craft
  • Effective feedback is about both praise and critique
  • What makes good walk-out music

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Read a transcript of this episode: https://share.descript.com/view/kGETrmoukKs

For the video version of this episode: https://youtu.be/-MmKlYZnVPg

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Need a speaking coach or looking for speaking courses? Here's our affiliate link for Kirsten's speaking coach, Tim David: https://bit.ly/3eCUFPy


Transcript
Kirsten:

Hello everybody.

Kirsten:

Welcome to Ongoing Mastery: Presenting & Speaking, the podcast,

Kirsten:

the community, the irreverent sense of humor that you love to hear.

Kellie:

Kirsten:

I'm Kirsten Rourke.

Kellie:

And I'm Kellie Donovan-Condron.

Kirsten:

And we are bringing you some talks today.

Kirsten:

We're going to pick up on stuff we talked about last week, which is

Kirsten:

the speaker friends, speaker family concept, and also, analysis of

Kirsten:

your talks, of your performance and kind of the support that you need.

Kirsten:

So

Kellie:

Definitely.

Kirsten:

What does that look like for you, Kellie, when you're

Kirsten:

getting speaker friends support?

Kellie:

When I'm getting support from speaker friends, I will often

Kellie:

know what I need help with, so I will give them something specific to

Kellie:

be looking for -- "I'm not sure how this section is landing," or "Am I

Kellie:

speaking too fast?," or "Is my volume the right pitch for this room?"

Kellie:

-- things that I can't assess for myself.

Kellie:

And it's useful to ask people who know what to look for, speaker friends, as

Kellie:

opposed to random people you can just beg, borrow, steal to get into the room,

Kellie:

because they know how it feels, both to be observing it and to be experiencing it.

Kellie:

And so the feedback that they give you is useful.

Kellie:

It's targeted, it's specific, and it's honest, right?

Kellie:

Speaker friends know that there's no point in snowing you with how

Kirsten:

Yeah

Kellie:

awesome something is if it isn't.

Kellie:

And

Kirsten:

Yeah, the, the blowing sunshine

Kellie:

yeah

Kirsten:

Sorry.

Kellie:

And, and because they're speakers, you know that they

Kellie:

understand what they're talking about.

Kellie:

You can trust the perspective you've just heard as being useful, coming from a place

Kellie:

of information, observation instead of a sort of clutching at straws, "I need to

Kellie:

say something, so I'll just say this."

Kirsten:

Yeah.

Kellie:

"I'll latch onto this tiniest detail and make it super important,

Kellie:

which is sometimes what can happen when well-meaning people don't

Kellie:

know how to give feedback, right?

Kirsten:

Yeah.

Kellie:

They miss something big and they blow up something

Kellie:

that's not that important.

Kellie:

So that's been a really useful part of the experience for me.

Kellie:

How about, how about for you, Kirsten?

Kirsten:

It's been, it's been really nice.

Kirsten:

I mean, I've been part of, my original speaker family goes back

Kirsten:

20 years to when I started doing conferences in the learning and

Kirsten:

development world and the Adobe world.

Kirsten:

And I got to revisit my original speaker family this last week in Vegas and see,

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

You know, Dr.

Kirsten:

Allen Partridge, Dr.

Kirsten:

Pooja Jaisingh, the original two that we're like, I'm like, oh my God,

Kirsten:

we've known each other for 150 years and you know, we've got families,

Kirsten:

we've got people, we're, we're moving on and we're all still connected.

Kirsten:

And I got to sit with my, my buds and it was good.

Kirsten:

And what is nice is that I'm now, since I'm moving from the L&D world out to the

Kirsten:

larger speaker world, we've picked up Innovation Women and I've got Tim David's

Kirsten:

Get Speaking Gigs group, and I'm in both of those on Fridays, which is today.

Kirsten:

So I got to go from my speaker friends group number one to my

Kirsten:

speaker friends group number two.

Kirsten:

And the commonality that I'm discovering is that, you know, some,

Kirsten:

you'll get feedback, by the way, I mean, you'll get feedback from

Kirsten:

speakers that you have to discount.

Kirsten:

That's not like,

Kellie:

Sure

Kirsten:

it's not like magically speakers automatically give the best feedback.

Kirsten:

It's that we're, we'll give feedback beyond, "That was great."

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

Because "That was great" is nice.

Kirsten:

It is, and I, I like hearing it, but it doesn't move the needle.

Kirsten:

It doesn't help you get, you know, get better in what you're doing.

Kirsten:

And it's always good if you can get to somebody who, who's been there and knows

Kirsten:

and can give you the critique sandwich.

Kirsten:

The nice thing, the thing to work on, the nice thing, you know, packaged

Kirsten:

up and handed to you so that you have something you can move forward on,

Kirsten:

but still feel, like, you know, still feel like you're doing a good job.

Kirsten:

And

Kellie:

Or, if it was great, they can be specific about why it was great.

Kirsten:

Hmmmmm

Kellie:

You know, just saying, "Oh, that was great!"

Kellie:

doesn't give you useful information about what to build on.

Kirsten:

Yeah.

Kirsten:

Yeah.

Kirsten:

I actually, my question for you is, is that different coming from academia?

Kirsten:

I mean,

Kellie:

Yes

Kirsten:

as you know, as a professor, I would imagine that you didn't, you didn't,

Kirsten:

you know, get with other professors and talk about your performance.

Kirsten:

It's more like the depth of your work and your students, but

Kirsten:

not as much of the stage work.

Kellie:

Yes, yes.

Kellie:

Although sometimes, especially if you are in graduate school and attending

Kellie:

conferences at that early professional stage, there will be some, it's not

Kellie:

called "How to Give a Paper, How to Give a Panel 101," but some kind of

Kellie:

"feedback because you are new, hear from more experienced folks" context.

Kellie:

But for the most part, no.

Kellie:

For the most part, the information we get back about our performance comes

Kellie:

via student evaluations, where they often need to be tempered with all

Kellie:

kinds of other concerns and commentary about how one dresses or, you know,

Kellie:

the, the way that you choose to present a particular piece of material may

Kellie:

or may not be about the material.

Kellie:

It might be about, "I had four midterms this week," right?

Kellie:

So we don't get a whole lot of that.

Kellie:

We get some ongoing professional development in my current department.

Kellie:

We'll observe each other's classes, but it's not directly performance-based.

Kellie:

Sometimes that'll come into it, but it's mostly content, yeah.

Kirsten:

Yeah, I think it's a lot harder, because certainly in the

Kirsten:

training world, you know, as a freelancer that was doing technical

Kirsten:

training and instructional design, we wouldn't really critique each other.

Kirsten:

We'd more give each other survival tips and tricks and, you know, "Oh by the

Kirsten:

way, in Boston, here's a secret place to park," you know, that kind of stuff.

Kellie:

Kirsten:

But in, what I find interesting is, is speakers specifically, more

Kirsten:

than any group I've seen before, except possibly the, you know, the extended

Kirsten:

dance troupe, we would all support each other and all give each other

Kirsten:

feedback, but we were also a troupe.

Kirsten:

Whereas,

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

that wasn't really something we did with other people.

Kirsten:

Whereas among speakers, it's interesting because you don't give unsolicited,

Kirsten:

you don't go up to somebody and go, "Hey, let me analyze your performance."

Kirsten:

But if you're both speakers, you might end up having a conversation

Kirsten:

with them and going, "Okay, so what hit, what didn't, what worked?"

Kirsten:

and depending on how comfortable you are with that person or

Kirsten:

how much you want to, you could actually get into the meat of it.

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

So it's, it's an interesting place.

Kirsten:

I got to send the video, you know, the sample, example of my TEDx

Kirsten:

to my speaking coach, Tim David.

Kirsten:

And he was lovely.

Kirsten:

He was like, "There's a lot of gold here," which is a very polite way

Kirsten:

of going, "Mmm, needs some work."

Kirsten:

Kellie:

Kirsten:

but he also wasn't wrong in, you know, he is like,

Kirsten:

he, he identified the gold.

Kirsten:

But it was really, it was lovely being able to kind of have him come along

Kirsten:

and go, "What about flipping this?

Kirsten:

What about that?

Kirsten:

Why are you doing this here?"

Kirsten:

And then,

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

you know, kind of thinking it through, because you put a lot into this.

Kirsten:

I don't, I don't know anybody in the speaking world that is not doing it out

Kirsten:

of a sense of a personal drive to share and give and, and make the world a better

Kirsten:

place, even though yes, it's a job.

Kirsten:

We want money.

Kirsten:

Hey, I like money.

Kirsten:

Pay me,

Kellie:

Kirsten:

and it's a service.

Kirsten:

We're trying to move

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

people.

Kirsten:

So, I, everybody I know has that same kind of passion about "Oh, but I just really,

Kirsten:

you know, I want people to understand or see or hear or feel this thing," and

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

whether it's, you know, about mobile development and eLearning,

Kirsten:

or whether it's about how to handle grief, it's still, there's still

Kirsten:

the same driver underneath it.

Kellie:

Yeah.

Kellie:

And it's about connecting with your audience.

Kellie:

It doesn't matter what you're saying.

Kellie:

The connection with the audience is the critical piece, because without it,

Kellie:

it doesn't matter what you're saying.

Kellie:

You can't say anything.

Kirsten:

Yeah.

Kellie:

Yeah.

Kirsten:

Yeah.

Kellie:

And that, that mission to connect.

Kirsten:

I'm going to actually give a specific shout out to IDLance, because I

Kirsten:

brought this up in one of the two speaker groups today, which is, if you are either

Kirsten:

a speaker or you're building classes or courses or webinars or what have you,

Kirsten:

it's very hard to get out of your own way.

Kirsten:

You know, we're all subject matter experts.

Kirsten:

It's hard to get out of our own heads and see our content from another perspective.

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

And there is a group of people called instructional designers who

Kirsten:

literally design instruction and their job is to be an objective outside influence

Kirsten:

that can look and shape and, and adjust your content based on what your goals

Kirsten:

are, like looking at your objectives.

Kirsten:

So, any time, like, you want the content analysis or the structure or refining,

Kirsten:

or "I want to hit these marks with my content," somebody with ID skills,

Kirsten:

you know, and IDLance is great because they have a really broad range of

Kirsten:

instructional designers, so they kind of know what the community can offer and can

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

kind of talk to you.

Kirsten:

Plus, Parker and Andrea are wonderful, wonderful people and are really big

Kirsten:

hearted, so I want to make sure I share the love with them because,

Kirsten:

they're, you know, when you find the people you like working with, you

Kirsten:

want everybody to know about them.

Kirsten:

It's like

Kellie:

Exactly.

Kirsten:

Check them out.

Kirsten:

They're great.

Kellie:

Kirsten:

So, since we're, I'm doing shoutouts, I'm going to do one more,

Kirsten:

and I'm going to hold this card up.

Kirsten:

There we go.

Kirsten:

Jameka, Jameka Bingham, the Inspirational Station.

Kirsten:

Jameka, your taking me aside when I was doing my first TEDx this last

Kirsten:

weekend and taking my hand and giving me support and love and grace and

Kirsten:

saying, "Hey, the world is, the world is where it's supposed to be for you.

Kirsten:

You're in the right space."

Kirsten:

I, it was incredibly gracious and kind and thank you.

Kirsten:

So I just want to shout that out because I was really, really lucky

Kirsten:

that my first TEDx was the TEDx Alief people out of Houston, because they

Kirsten:

are a wonderful group of people.

Kirsten:

They are lovely, big hearted, compassionate, and they really fed

Kirsten:

every one of us that was doing it.

Kirsten:

So,

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

you know, I mean, we're up there and we're, we're doing

Kirsten:

it and there was cheers and claps and we're like, "You got this."

Kirsten:

So it was just a wonderful experience.

Kirsten:

So big, huge shout out.

Kellie:

That's so great.

Kirsten:

Yeah, I was, I didn't know what to expect.

Kellie:

Sure

Kirsten:

You know.

Kellie:

I love that the day was, you didn't put it this way, but it

Kellie:

sounds like the day was just sort of one big passing, passing the

Kellie:

love from speaker to speaker, right?

Kellie:

We're going to be behind this person.

Kellie:

Now we're going to add to that and be behind the next person.

Kellie:

We're going to add

Kirsten:

Yeah

Kellie:

to be behind the third person.

Kellie:

And that, that's just so generous and giving, and, just affirming.

Kellie:

That's,

Kirsten:

Yeah

Kellie:

I'm so happy for you.

Kirsten:

Yeah, I'm, I'm thrilled because coming into the, you know, the, the larger

Kirsten:

world now, since January, I'm from my L&D bubble of speaking and now coming out

Kirsten:

into it, I'm discovering that at least in the TEDx universe, it looks like every

Kirsten:

single one is kind of its own unique personality, its own little kingdom.

Kirsten:

So you never really know what you're going to get til you start

Kirsten:

to get to know the different people, the different players involved.

Kirsten:

And I met Adeseye, who was the producer for this, online because

Kirsten:

I found his online presence to be just so wonderful and amazing.

Kirsten:

And we had this great online conversation about dreams and vision and you

Kirsten:

know, sharing the energy with people.

Kirsten:

And that was long, you know, that was before I got a opportunity, he

Kirsten:

invited me to, you know, to apply.

Kirsten:

And

Kellie:

That was the summer.

Kirsten:

That, yeah, yeah.

Kirsten:

It was really, I mean, I think it's hard to tell.

Kirsten:

It's all a big white blur now.

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

It was sometime in this calendar year .

Kirsten:

It was sometime in this, but it's all been a big blur since January

Kirsten:

and I'm very happy about it.

Kirsten:

So we, in this podcast wanted to talk about, you know, speaker support

Kirsten:

and family and giving feedback.

Kirsten:

It is hard to get feedback.

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

It's hard to give feedback.

Kellie:

Yes.

Kirsten:

It's harder to get it.

Kellie:

Yeah, it is.

Kellie:

It is.

Kirsten:

And so as a professional of giving feedback, I'm

Kirsten:

going to put you on the spot.

Kirsten:

How do you

Kellie:

OK

Kirsten:

advise people who are not used to giving feedback to start doing it?

Kellie:

If someone asked me to give them feedback, I actually do this even

Kellie:

as a seasoned professional, my first question is, "What are you looking for?"

Kellie:

Sometimes people just want a general shout out.

Kellie:

Sometimes people want really detailed feedback and giving

Kellie:

the wrong sort is frustrating and kind of thwarts the purpose.

Kellie:

And the speaker looking for feedback is a little disgruntled.

Kellie:

And it's kind of hard to reset from that.

Kellie:

So knowing as the feedback giver, knowing what the speaker is looking for, will

Kellie:

help you know where to focus your energy.

Kellie:

You can't take notes on everything

Kirsten:

um-nmmm.

Kellie:

unless it's a one minute speech.

Kellie:

But anything more than five minutes, you're going to have to

Kellie:

choose what to pay attention to.

Kellie:

And then I would, this is what I do with my students, I would suggest breaking out

Kellie:

into performance and content so that you can make different kinds of notes, and

Kellie:

again, depending on what the speaker's looking for, but if there's something

Kellie:

that they don't know they need to know, you can make a note and tell them, "You

Kellie:

know, I saw some additional couple of things outside of what you asked for.

Kellie:

Would you like to hear them?"

Kellie:

Right?

Kirsten:

Hmm.

Kellie:

Just because you've observed it doesn't mean you have

Kellie:

to tell them about it, right?

Kirsten:

Yeah.

Kellie:

But, you know, some people don't know that their hands in and

Kellie:

out of their pockets, in and out of their pockets is really distracting.

Kirsten:

Kellie:

They don't even know they're doing it.

Kirsten:

Yep

Kellie:

Or, I teach college students, many of them don't dress

Kellie:

up all that time, all that much.

Kellie:

So when they are dressed up, they're maybe in unfamiliar clothes,

Kirsten:

Tugging

Kellie:

unfamiliar shoes, and

Kirsten:

Yeah

Kellie:

they'll shift their weight, and they'll fuss with

Kellie:

the sleeves and whatever, and they don't know they're doing it.

Kellie:

So, you know, I might have three categories, physical

Kellie:

performance, content, extras.

Kellie:

And, and that way the feedback giver can, can target more effectively and not try

Kellie:

to cover every single base all the time.

Kellie:

Those would be my first two big things.

Kellie:

What kind do you want?

Kellie:

And then bracketing different kinds so that as the speech performance

Kellie:

goes on, you can take notes in sort of different sections of your paper

Kellie:

instead of just trying to keep a linear list top to bottom of the page, right?

Kirsten:

Yeah.

Kirsten:

Yeah, definitely.

Kirsten:

I don't, I, I no longer wear bracelets because I would play with them.

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

and they would always be,

Kellie:

Umm-hmmm

Kirsten:

you know, picked up on microphone, also it was

Kirsten:

distracting and things like that.

Kirsten:

I will notice that

Kellie:

Yep

Kirsten:

it's hard.

Kirsten:

I, I've got to say, the best thing you can do is watch yourself on camera.

Kirsten:

It, it's awful.

Kirsten:

It's horrible.

Kirsten:

It's no fun.

Kellie:

It's terrible, no.

Kirsten:

It's terrible.

Kirsten:

We do not enjoy it.

Kirsten:

But noticing that you shift your weight back and forth.

Kirsten:

Or forward and back.

Kellie:

Mm-hmm.

Kirsten:

I'm sure I've told this story before about the, the, when I was

Kirsten:

doing my, my training and the younger kid, lovely, lovely guy, super smart,

Kirsten:

had his hands in his pockets and was rocking back and forth and he had

Kirsten:

loose, I mean this was a long time ago, he had sort of the 80s, 90s pants

Kirsten:

on and he had his hands, his pockets.

Kirsten:

And he was waving his crotch at us.

Kirsten:

And we had to

Kellie:

Kirsten:

kind of go, "That's not going to pick up well on camera,"

Kirsten:

because it was this very distracting.

Kirsten:

Yeah, you don't wanna do that.

Kirsten:

And you never see this stuff because

Kellie:

No

Kirsten:

you don't, you don't feel it.

Kirsten:

I would say the best thing that you can do is pick one thing you would like

Kirsten:

them to work on and two things that they did beautifully and sandwich it.

Kirsten:

Because for me, I know I, I need to, I need to, I need to give grace to the fact

Kirsten:

that we're all doing ongoing mastery.

Kirsten:

We're all working on getting better.

Kirsten:

And that takes time, and that means you can't work on

Kellie:

It does.

Kirsten:

everything at once.

Kirsten:

You have to

Kellie:

And it takes vulnerability.

Kirsten:

Yeah.

Kirsten:

Yeah.

Kirsten:

And that's, And that's hard.

Kellie:

Yeah.

Kellie:

Vulnerability, openness.

Kellie:

It's hard.

Kellie:

And there's only so much of it you can do at once.

Kirsten:

And, and the best thing, and we do this with our clients, is that you

Kirsten:

don't, when you watch your own performance -- and this is really, really hard -- the

Kirsten:

last pass, if you watch yourself more than once, the last pass, you need to

Kirsten:

only look for things you did well and make a note of at least three of them.

Kirsten:

Because we never look

Kellie:

Yes

Kirsten:

at our good.

Kirsten:

We never ever look

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

at our good.

Kirsten:

And you have to end on that because otherwise it's draining.

Kirsten:

It's hard to do this work.

Kellie:

Mm-hmm.

Kirsten:

And if you, every single time you evaluate yourself, are like, "Oh.

Kirsten:

These are the 12 things I need to fix.,"it's hard to

Kirsten:

keep the momentum going.

Kirsten:

So instead, it's "Okay, here's some things to work on.

Kirsten:

Here's things I might work on later if I have time and money.

Kirsten:

And here's things I did really well."

Kirsten:

And end on that

Kellie:

Yep

Kirsten:

and walk away.

Kirsten:

So that's hard to do.

Kellie:

The semester, the semester I was in the art room, so it had giant

Kellie:

floor to ceiling glass pane windows, and in between those were giant floor

Kellie:

to ceiling mirror panes, and there's a computer station in the classroom.

Kellie:

I can't move it.

Kellie:

It's bolted to the floor.

Kellie:

So for the entire semester, I watched myself teach because I had to stand at the

Kellie:

computer to show what I wanted to show, and therefore that's where the mirror was.

Kellie:

And it was so, so distracting.

Kellie:

And so that thing you just said about, "Okay.

Kellie:

Next class, I'm going to work on this one thing," because I'm

Kellie:

still trying to teach my class.

Kellie:

I still need to get through this set of material while I'm also

Kellie:

trying to do the brain processing of working on the one point, right?

Kirsten:

Yeah.

Kellie:

And so at the end of the class, I'd be like, "Did I do that better?

Kellie:

Yes, I did.

Kellie:

Good job, me!

Kirsten:

Kellie:

Okay, what's the next thing I'm going to work on?"

Kellie:

But that, that live, so I didn't have a recording, but that live watching myself

Kellie:

teach was a really formative experience, informative, somewhat terrifying,

Kirsten:

Yeah

Kellie:

but really useful.

Kirsten:

Yeah, at dance events, you know, you'd have the wall of mirrors and

Kellie:

mm-hmm

Kirsten:

the instructor in front.

Kirsten:

And I would end up, you know, I'm assertive, I'd be one of the people in

Kirsten:

the front row, so obviously we needed to flip rows because the same group of us

Kirsten:

always ended up in the front and then the shy people always ended up in the back.

Kirsten:

So luckily, in Middle Eastern dance, they do a lot of flipping

Kirsten:

the rows, which is great.

Kirsten:

And when you're up to where you can see the camera, not the camera, sorry,

Kirsten:

the mirrors, it really helps because you're looking at the instructor

Kirsten:

and then you're looking at yourself and you're doing the same arms.

Kirsten:

No, you're really not.

Kellie:

Kirsten:

and you move your body and go, "Oh, wait a minute.

Kirsten:

They're do, oh, they're here.

Kirsten:

Even though it feels like they're here.

Kirsten:

They're here."

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

And that feedback, that reciprocity that you get, is

Kirsten:

kind of the same stuff that you can get by watching yourself.

Kirsten:

You can kind of go, "I remember being really energetic here.

Kirsten:

It's not reading.

Kellie:

Yeah.

Kirsten:

What could I do to make that read more?

Kirsten:

Maybe lean in a little bit more, or gesture a little bit broader."

Kirsten:

Or "That's reading bigger than I intended."

Kirsten:

You know, so it's, it's very much a performance evaluation.

Kirsten:

But just be kind to yourselves .

Kirsten:

Because it's, it's ongoing mastery.

Kirsten:

We're never done.

Kellie:

No, no.

Kirsten:

You're never, when you're done, you're, that's it.

Kirsten:

Like it's over.

Kirsten:

So it's always,

Kellie:

I still trip over my feet in the classroom.

Kellie:

I'll turn too fast and

Kirsten:

Umm-hmmm

Kellie:

try to point at something and overbalance and kind of

Kellie:

grasp onto the table right there.

Kellie:

I think there's a running betting pool on which day it's going to be before

Kellie:

I just absolutely twist my ankle.

Kellie:

So, you know, I could understand myself in space a little bit better.

Kirsten:

Okay.

Kirsten:

But please don't hurt yourself, please.

Kellie:

I won't.

Kirsten:

Because,

Kellie:

Okay.

Kirsten:

No, that would be bad.

Kirsten:

So that was what we wanted to come on today to talk about is just,

Kirsten:

you know, a little more about analysis and performance, you know,

Kirsten:

the value of finding people who understand the work that you do.

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

And that doesn't mean they understand your topic.

Kirsten:

You know, speaker,

Kellie:

Right

Kirsten:

speaker friends don't necessarily have to understand your

Kirsten:

work in the, in the words to understand the art of what you're doing.

Kirsten:

So it's always worth finding communities and the Innovation Women community

Kirsten:

and Tim, Tim David's Get Speaking Gigs communities are every Friday.

Kirsten:

I, I love those.

Kirsten:

They feed my soul.

Kirsten:

So please come, come find us.

Kirsten:

We are on LinkedIn, in Ongoing Mastery: Presenting & Speaking, the group.

Kirsten:

And, let's give everybody a, a little homework assignment this time.

Kellie:

Ooh.

Kellie:

What's our homework?

Kirsten:

Walkout music.

Kirsten:

In walkout, so walkout music, if you could,

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

if you could put, pick a piece of music, you're walking out

Kirsten:

on stage, you're about to do, You are just, you are going to go kick ass

Kirsten:

and take names, what is that song?

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

Tell us in the chat.

Kirsten:

Tell us on the socials.

Kirsten:

Come in to LinkedIn and let us know.

Kirsten:

Kellie, what is your, what is your dream song?

Kirsten:

If any song you pick would absolutely nail it for people, what would that be?

Kellie:

Dropkick Murphy's, "Queen of Suffolk County."

Kellie:

I grew up in Boston.

Kellie:

I am a Boston girl to my bones, and there's a group of friends

Kellie:

that when they hear that song, in any context, will immediately text

Kellie:

me and tell me they've heard it.

Kellie:

So that would be my ideal walk out music.

Kellie:

Yours?

Kirsten:

So if I wanted to really have it be like a wonderful, edgy,

Kirsten:

you know, "Come on, come out, let's, let's have some serious energy," I'd

Kirsten:

have to pick something from the Pogues, because that would just feed my soul.

Kirsten:

Though,

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

I will say that what I did this last week was I used Pentatonix, and

Kirsten:

the wonderful thing about their music is that the vocal performances are diverse

Kirsten:

enough that you can find kind of anything.

Kirsten:

And I found something that was just a little, a little R&B, a little

Kirsten:

kind of, "Hey, let's come and party.

Kirsten:

Let's do this thing."

Kirsten:

And that fit

Kellie:

Yeah

Kirsten:

exactly the right energy.

Kirsten:

So I would probably pick, you know, pick something that had, oh God, I,

Kirsten:

you know, I think maybe Prince, like something that had the strong musical

Kirsten:

quality, but also the energy and just be coming out and going, "Okay, ready?

Kirsten:

Are we ready?

Kirsten:

Shall we dance?

Kirsten:

Let's do this thing."

Kellie:

Cannot, cannot go wrong with Prince, always.

Kirsten:

So everybody let us know what yours is, Again, I did not pick specific

Kirsten:

music, so that will be my homework, is to find a very specific song, not

Kellie:

Okay

Kirsten:

just an artist.

Kirsten:

Thank you everybody.

About the Podcast

Show artwork for Ongoing Mastery: Presenting & Speaking
Ongoing Mastery: Presenting & Speaking
Presentation and Speaking Skills for Business Leaders

About your host

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Kirsten Rourke